The Nature of True Virtue: Theology, Psychology, and Politics in the Writings of Henry James, Sr., Henry James, Jr., and William James

By James Duban | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am mindful of colleagues and friends who have responded supportively, in Texas and elsewhere, to various parts of my manuscript. Thanks are due Jim Baird, Ishmael Bustinza, Howard Ford, Stan Goldman, Bob Hughes, Jim Linebarger, Don Pickens, Arnold Silver, John Smith, and Bob Stevens. On several points pertaining to liberal Christianity, I am indebted to Conrad Wright Sr., and, with respect to advice about navigating the Henry Whitney Bellows Papers, to the late Reverend Walter D. Kring. The suggestions of anonymous manuscript readers have proven quite helpful. Invaluable, moreover, have been the courtesies extended by Ms. Melanie Wisner and Ms. Jennie Rathbun, Houghton Reading Room, Harvard University, and Ms. Leslie Morris, Curator of Manuscripts, Houghton Library; by Dr. Mary Kay Klein, Director, Swedenborg School of Religion; by Ms. Jean Hilliard, Librarian, Swedenborg School of Religion; by Mr. William M. Fowler Jr., Director, Massachusetts Historical Society; by Mark Dolive, Head of Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery, University of North Texas; and by Ms. Bay James Baker, Executor of the James Family Estate. Texas-sized thanks especially go to friend and scholar Alan Gribben for his close reading of this study and for his editorial contributions.

While frequently challenging the assumptions of my predecessors in James family studies, this book benefits from their diligence and insights. Alfred Habegger's The Father deserves special mention in that regard.

I am indebted, as well, to Fairleigh Dickinson University Press and Associated University Presses: to Directors Harry Keyishian and Julien Yoseloff for their faith in my work; to Laura Reed-Morrison for her superb copyediting; and to Managing Editor Chris Retz for her superb professionalism and goodwill in guiding this book through production.

Of course, a book about family relations makes one mindful of departed parents Sylvia Mould Duban and Edmund Irving Duban. Mindful of his own deceased parents, William James remarked that "the mere fact that matter could have taken for a time that precious form, ought to make matter sacred ever after." So it does. In many ways this book is a tribute to the glowing humanism and scholarly values cherished by Sylvia and Edmund.

And to the extent that fields of consciousness are conditioned by the

-9-

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