Such Rare Citings: The Prose Poem in English Literature

By N. Santilli | Go to book overview

Preface

I WOULD LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING INDIVIDUALS AND INSTITUTIONS for their generous assistance at various stages of this project.

I have benefited from research awards granted by King's College London and the British Academy. I would like to thank the staff at King's, in particular, Janet Bately and Max Saunders. I am very grateful to Jacques Berthoud and Steven Connor for their spirited response to the work. To Michel Delville I am indebted for his informed comments and suggestions as much as for his generously expressed support. My thanks also to Ronald Corthell, Leonee Ormond, Christine Rees and Amanda Rigali for their comments on various chapters. The library staff at King's, the University of London Library and the British Library have been very helpful in my perennial burrowing for specific material. Christopher Ricks, John Beer and Rupert Loydell were very kind to reply to my detailed enquiries. John Pilling and Michael Bott welcomed me to the Beckett archive at Reading and generously took time to discuss my ideas with me. Richard Salmon, Joseph Roth, and Steven Whalen gave me their invaluable technical assistance. Many thanks to Harry Keyishian at Fairleigh Dickinson University Press and Julien Yoseloff at Associated University Presses. Special thanks to Tamsin Black for her advice on the translations and for discussing all things French with me. Also to Christine Retz who wisely kept me occupied with other thoughts while she carefully managed my manuscript through the press.

This project simply would not have been realized without the lively support of my family: Ron, Anita, and Marina Santilli. It is lovingly dedicated to the memory of my mother, who took into her hands each chapter that I wrote. Her touch imbues these pages.

Finally, to John Woolford, who first taught me the art of thought, and who continues to be an inspiring maestro, I shall always be grateful in my debt.

-9-

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Such Rare Citings: The Prose Poem in English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Acknowledgments 11
  • Introduction 13
  • Abbreviations 27
  • 1: The Prose Poem and the Romantic Fragment 31
  • 2: De Quincey and Baudelaire 71
  • 3: Contexts I 98
  • 4: Contexts II: Mercian Hymns 118
  • 5: Parallelism 137
  • 6: Beckett's Late Prose 161
  • 7: The Prose Poem and the City 181
  • Notes 207
  • Works Cited 259
  • Index 277
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