Such Rare Citings: The Prose Poem in English Literature

By N. Santilli | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Jonathan Monroe, A Poverty of Objects: The Prose Poem and the Politics of Genre (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1987).

2. Margueritte Murphy, A Tradition of Subversion: The Prose Poem in English from Wilde to Ashbery (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992).

3. Stamos Metzidakis, Repetition and Semiotics: Interpreting Prose Poems (Birmingham, Ala.: Summa Publications, 1986). Metzidakis records his debt to Riffaterre's description of the prose poem as a work generated by the reader's perception of an intertextual matrix that replaces the standard frame of verse. See Michael Riffaterre, Semiotics of Poetry (Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1978), 117–24.

4. Terdiman supplements the notion of time and process to Saussure's basic model in order to give voice to the external, the "text's environment." Discourse /Counter-Discourse: The Theory and Practice of Symbolic Resistance in Nineteenth-Century France (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1985), 17–29.

5. Murphy, Tradition of Subversion, 6.

6. Stephen Fredman, Poet's Prose: The Crisis of American Verse, 2nd ed. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 6.

7. Thomas O'Beebee, The Ideology of Genre: A Comparative Study of Generic Instability (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1994), 125.

8. Ibid., 130.

9. Dennis Keene, ed. and trans., The Modern Japanese Prose Poem (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980), 18.

10. John Simon, The Prose Poem as a Genre in Nineteenth-Century European Literature (London and New York: Garland, 1987), 699. I use the term "prose poetic" advisedly. Hill and Beckett do not give their work the title of prose poems.

11. In 1893, Wilde used the term 'prose poem' to describe his "obscene" letter to Lord Alfred Douglas. Wilde first used the term in reply to his blackmailers and continued to defend the epithet during all three trials. However, his attempt to sonnetize the letter was decried as tantamount to sanitizing it. Throughout the course of these trials, the prose poem came to be equated, in the mind of the reading public, with at least immodesty and at most French decadence and sexual depravity. The view was articulated by the Solicitor-General in his closing speech at the third trial at which Wilde was convicted: "It has been attempted to show that this was a

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Such Rare Citings: The Prose Poem in English Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface 9
  • Acknowledgments 11
  • Introduction 13
  • Abbreviations 27
  • 1: The Prose Poem and the Romantic Fragment 31
  • 2: De Quincey and Baudelaire 71
  • 3: Contexts I 98
  • 4: Contexts II: Mercian Hymns 118
  • 5: Parallelism 137
  • 6: Beckett's Late Prose 161
  • 7: The Prose Poem and the City 181
  • Notes 207
  • Works Cited 259
  • Index 277
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