Trains and Technology: The American Railroad in the Nineteenth Century - Vol. 1

By Anthony J. Bianculli | Go to book overview

Index
adhesion, 30–31, 50, 74–78, 85–86, 90, 92–95, 111, 128–30, 160, 183–84, 207
“Aerodromic” railroad, 190–91
air-powered locomotive, 193–96
air spring, 76
Allen, Horatio, 35, 39–40, 42, 44–46, 71–73, 205
Altoona Works (of the Pennsylvania Railroad), 91, 110, 139, 147, 158
American Locomotive Co., 146, 166, 204
Andrews, James, 119–20
articulated locomotive, 30–32, 46, 216
axle: half-crank, 50
Balanced Locomotive and Engineering Co., 185
Baldwin, Matthias, 38, 40, 47, 49, 57, 62, 77, 83, 94–95, 137
Baldwin Locomotive Works, 36, 38, 47, 54, 68, 76–78, 80, 86–87, 92, 96, 116, 122–24, 126–27, 129–30, 132, 136–39, 141, 144–45, 147, 149–50, 152–55, 158–59, 162–64, 167, 181, 189–90, 195–96, 202, 204, 207, 210–11, 214
“Baltimore engine.” See “grasshopper” locomotives Batchellor, C. H., 149
bell, locomotive, 50, 103, 206–7
Belpaire, Alfred, 127
“bicycle” locomotive. See locomotive, by wheel arrangement: X-2-X
Bissell, Levi, 76, 122
“blind” wheels, 30, 74, 90, 162, 164
“bogie.” See truck: pilot
“bogie” locomotive, 166
boiler: Altoona, 127; Belpaire, 127–28; boot (Tee), 175–76; Bury, 30, 50, 88, 105; design and construction, 34, 62–63, 85, 104–8, 117–18; Dimpfel (watertube), 62; Hazleton, 51; insulation, 63; Stephenson, 88, 105; tubes, 34, 41, 46, 49, 51–52, 54–55, 62, 84–85 90; Vanderbilt, 164; wagon top, 105–7
Bourdon gauge. See gauge: pressure brakes, 89, 152
Brooks, James, 74
Brooks Locomotive Works, 128, 139, 148–49, 154, 159, 168–69, 179
Buchanan, William, 155
Bury, Edmund, 50
cab, 38, 56, 82, 89, 95–96, 98, 101–3, 124–25, 147
cable railway, 192
Camel (or camelback) locomotive, 30, 88–92, 111, 124, 142–44
Campbell, Henry, 74, 78
“cheese boiler,” 51
Childs, Ezekiel, 39, 50
Civil War, 18, 102, 105, 112, 117–20
Climax locomotive. See geared locomotive
Clinton, DeWitt, 17
coal crab. See crab locomotive
cog locomotive. See rack locomotive
Colburn, Zerah, 142–43, 186, 216
combustion: coal, 45–46, 55, 81–85, 90, 109, 117, 137, 14145, 215–16; oil, 145; wood, 83–85, 137, 211
compound locomotive, 51, 128, 137, 145–50
Cooke Locomotive and Machine Works, 95, 109, 119, 132
Cooper, Peter, 39, 40, 51, 197
Costell, Stacy, 39
counterbalancing, 79
“cowcatcher.” See pilot “crab” locomotive, 38, 54–56
Crampton, Thomas, 94
Crampton locomotive, 89, 92, 94–95
crosshead, 30
crownsheet, 30
Crozet, Claudius, 34, 150
culm, 143–45
cutoff, 64–65, 68–69, 91
Daft, Leo, 199–200
Darrell, Nicholas, 44
Davenport, Thomas, 196
Davis, Phineas, 39–40, 50–52, 54
Detmold, Charles E., 39, 44
Diesel locomotive, 192–93
Dotterer, Thomas, 39
Dripps, Isaac, 69, 86, 89, 94–95, 213
Drury, Gardner, 60
dummy locomotive, 169–71
Dunham, Henry, 47
“Dutch wagon,” 107–9
dynamometer car, 138, 151
Eames Vacuum Brake Co., 152
Eastwick, Andrew, 41
Eddy, Wilson, 107–9, 113, 138
“Eddy Clock” locomotive, 106, 108–9
Edison, Thomas, 198, 201
Empire State Express train, 155
equalizer: driving wheel, 30, 38, 75–76, 103
exhaust nozzle, 30
Exposition Flyer train, 156–57
Evans, Oliver, 16, 33, 150–51
Fairlie, Robert, 165
Fairlie locomotive, 46, 128, 165–66

-237-

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Trains and Technology: The American Railroad in the Nineteenth Century - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Preface: Comments from the Cab 9
  • Acknowledgements 13
  • Introduction 15
  • Locomotives 25
  • General Description of the American Steam Locomotive 27
  • 1: Introduction to Motive Power 33
  • 2: Motive Power Infancy, 1830–1850 38
  • 3: Motive Power Adolescence, 1850–1875 104
  • 4: Motive Power Maturity, 1875–1900 135
  • 5: Locomotive Appliances and Appurtenances 205
  • Notes 217
  • Bibliography 230
  • Index 237
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