The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis

By David Kingdon; Douglas Turkington | Go to book overview

Chapter 16

HOW DOES IMPLEMENTATION
HAPPEN?

David Kingdon

So far, a variety of practitioners with a range of cases and training have described their experience of using CBT, but how can this training and experience be made more widely available? The widespread use of new evidence-based practices, like CBT of psychosis, develops through diffusion, dissemination and specific implementation initiatives (Koerner et al., 2001). Usually diffusion occurs through publication in scientific journals, conference presentations, etc., but this leads, at best, to very gradual incorporation into routine clinical practice. The exception is where the audience is open and seeking information, has minimal search costs for it, and staff are strongly motivated and highly reinforced by what they learn and their experiences. In the USA, this has been the case with the uptake of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) and to some extent this has also occurred with CBT for psychosis in the UK. Suicides, the repeated experience of treatment failure, and recurrent ineffective admissions has, according to Koerner et al. (2001), fuelled a groundswell of demand for training and implementation of DBT. Although it has a limited evidence base, the widespread perception of success in using these techniques has led to its spread. CBT for psychosis has had a major impact in the UK and Scandinavia but less so elsewhere despite its much stronger basis in evidence (see later). Some of this may be due to the need for time for the significance of the studies to penetrate, but there is also the need to develop [product champions] and development proposals to access resources. Koerner also cites the importance of having an RCT published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry (e.g. Sensky et al., 2000), as being influential because it is where decision-makers look, not only in the USA but elsewhere. It may also be that the clinical impact has a less direct effect on patients' symptoms and quality of life, and possibly admission rates but not as dramatically as has occurred with DBT.

A Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis. Edited by
David Kingdon and Douglas Turkington. © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Case Study Guide to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy of Psychosis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.