Winning the Talent War: A Strategic Approach to Attracting, Developing and Retaining the Best People

By Charles Woodruffe | Go to book overview

5
If the core is contingent

If the need for cost cutting and flexibility is the dominant message received by the core, it will mean that they feel subject to the sense of contingency described in Chapter 2. People will see themselves as under a psychological contract of less commitment than in the past from the organization. This will be demonstrated most graphically by periodic episodes of 'decruitment' by 'denominator managers'. However, these episodes are only the eruption of the underlying attitude towards people. Both the episodes and the attitude will have their effects. Overall, and put simply, these effects are likely to add up to the undermining of the attempt to build a winning resource.


THE AFTER-SHOCK OF DECRUITING

Clearly, one cannot set one's face against reality. Delayering has been inevitable in order to achieve responsiveness to the environment and, naturally, there will be occasions when any organization has to make staff redundant. At issue is how this is communicated and particularly whether laying people off is seen by staff as a knee-jerk reaction or a last resort. Delayering as it has frequently been carried out perversely loosens the very commitment of the newly empowered people in whom it is required. It has suggested to staff that their lay-offs are the first and an easy option while stockholders grow rich and senior management continue to enjoy 'fat cat' salaries. In addition, lay-offs and restructuring in some organizations have become a repeated reaction, and a failed solution, to the contemporary environment. To cap it all, with each round of redundancies, organizations have had to be decreasingly 'generous' with their severance terms (Airman and Post, 1996).

Under these circumstances, it seems inevitable that those working in downsizing organizations will wonder when their turn might come and that those who have been laid off and are in new employment will wonder whether their turn might come again. Hamel and Prahalad (1994) declare that 'one of the inevitable results of downsizing is plummeting employee

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Winning the Talent War: A Strategic Approach to Attracting, Developing and Retaining the Best People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Introduction: Focusing through a Fog ix
  • Part One - Creating a Strategy for Winning Talented People 1
  • 1: Our Changing World 3
  • 2: Dancing Giants 13
  • 3: What About the Knowledge Workers? 25
  • 4: Squaring the Circle 35
  • 5: If the Core is Contingent 47
  • 6: Shreds of Evidence 57
  • 7: Finding a Third Way 65
  • 8: Siren Voices to Short-Termism 83
  • Part Two - Implementing the Strategy of Gaining Commitment by Showing Commitment 93
  • 9: Who Are You Calling Core? 95
  • 10: Roll Up for the Mystery Tour 101
  • 11: Selecting for the Future 111
  • 12: Development 127
  • 13: Showing You Care 141
  • 14: Whatever Turns You On 151
  • 15: Managing Careers for Commitment 161
  • Bibliography 171
  • Index of First Named Authors 185
  • Subject Index 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.