Linking to the Past: A Brief Introduction to Archaeology

By Kenneth L. Feder | Go to book overview

Preface

Considering the abundance of introductory archaeology texts already available, a number of questions likely occur to you about contemplating yet another, beginning with the most obvious: Why bother? What could this author add that might provide a significantly different and attractive option for introducing archaeology?


The Web Model

I admit it—I love the Internet and am thoroughly addicted to it. Certainly, the Net offers a vast, virtually inclusive information database. I can't remember the last time I searched on the Net for some arcane bit of trivia that I couldn't find. At least as much as I enjoy the universe of data available on-line, I also appreciate the ways in which that information is linked together. Nearly every Web site you visit on a particular topic provides links to other sites that provide complementary information. I have long found it amazing and even exhilarating to go on-line seeking a particular piece of information and, then, by following links to other sites, discovering additional interesting stuff I wasn't even aware of when I began the initial, narrowly focused inquiry. Therein lay my “Eureka” and the beginning of my quest to provide a meaningfully different option for introducing archaeology.


The Format: Book and CD

By their nature, books tend to convey information in a linear way. Readers move in a more or less straight line from topic to topic and from chapter to chapter. A Web site, however, links together the discussions of connected or related ideas, concepts, and issues and allows individuals to explore a topic along a variety of pathways.

Students are nearly universally Web-literate. Almost all of the students I know spend an enormous amount of time on-line and are very familiar with the nonlinear and flexible style of information gathering that the Internet affords. This book exploits that familiarity and comfort level by using what is essentially a web-based format for introducing archaeology. Linking to the Past presents the core content found in an introductory course in archaeology

-xi-

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Linking to the Past: A Brief Introduction to Archaeology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Linking to the Past - A Brief Introduction iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue - How to Use Linking to the Past 1
  • Introduction 7
  • An Archaeological Narrative - How I Spent My Summer Vacation 14
  • Unit 1 16
  • Unit 2 43
  • Unit 3 53
  • Unit 4 82
  • Unit 5 106
  • Unit 6 124
  • Unit 7 150
  • Unit 8 165
  • Unit 9 181
  • Unit 10 192
  • Unit 11 225
  • Unit 12 249
  • Unit 13 273
  • Unit 14 297
  • Unit 15 304
  • Epilogue - Can We Reconstruct the Past? 311
  • Glossary 314
  • References 351
  • Index 363
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