Linking to the Past: A Brief Introduction to Archaeology

By Kenneth L. Feder | Go to book overview

UNIT 14


Wood Lily: Portrait of a Life
Food for Thought

The Environment of Wood Lily

The world in which the residents of Wood Lily lived, at least the physical environment in which they found themselves, would be readily recognized by any of us alive today in the eastern woodlands of North America. Pollen analysis and identification of wood in the fireplaces built by the inhabitants of the village that became the Wood Lily archaeological site show us that the trees growing there some three thousand years ago reflect generally the same mix of species that currently characterizes the forests of southern New England, including especially oak, maple, hickory, pine, and birch (Figure 14.1). That's a good indication that the overall climate at Wood Lily three thousand years ago—long, cold, snowy winters; rainy springs; long, humid, hot summers; and breathtaking, chilly autumns—was much the same as it is now in southern New England.

Although economically important species like chestnut and elm are largely gone due to relatively recent historical fungal infestations (chestnut blight, which began its devastation in the early 1900s, and Dutch elm disease, first identified in the United States in 1930), many of the other tree species of the modern eastern woodlands are the same as those a resident of Wood Lily would have regularly encountered and have had available for use in building a home, crafting a spear, carving a bowl, making a bark container, producing a canoe, or fueling a fire. Even though wooden tools were not found at Wood Lily and no structural remains endured for our recovery, carbonized fragments of wood, burned in the villagers' fire hearths, were recovered and analyzed. Not surprisingly, we were able to determine that their fuel comprised mainly oak and hickory.

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Linking to the Past: A Brief Introduction to Archaeology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Linking to the Past - A Brief Introduction iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Prologue - How to Use Linking to the Past 1
  • Introduction 7
  • An Archaeological Narrative - How I Spent My Summer Vacation 14
  • Unit 1 16
  • Unit 2 43
  • Unit 3 53
  • Unit 4 82
  • Unit 5 106
  • Unit 6 124
  • Unit 7 150
  • Unit 8 165
  • Unit 9 181
  • Unit 10 192
  • Unit 11 225
  • Unit 12 249
  • Unit 13 273
  • Unit 14 297
  • Unit 15 304
  • Epilogue - Can We Reconstruct the Past? 311
  • Glossary 314
  • References 351
  • Index 363
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.