Italy in the Central Middle Ages: 1000-1300

By David Abulafia | Go to book overview
Charles of Anjou and the two kingdoms76
The Sicilian Vespers and arrival of the king of Aragon79
The two kingdoms of Sicily and Naples80
3Papal Italy82
Brenda Bolton
Introduction82
The pope and the emperors86
The papal recovery89
Institutions91
North and south93
Papal itineration95
Development and support for the faith98
Defending the faith: heresy100
The Jubilee102
Conclusion102
4The rise of the signori104
Trevor Dean
Piacenza109
Verona111
Milan114
Ferrara119
Some common themes121
PART II SOCIAL CHANGE AND THE COMMERCIAL REVOLUTION
5Trade and navigation127
Marco Tangheroni
Italian maritime expansion in the western Mediterranean127
Italian maritime expansion in the eastern Mediterranean131
Italian cities and the Mediterranean, 1200-1350134
Technical and institutional aspects of Italian maritime commerce140
Maritime commerce and the Italian economy144

-x-

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Italy in the Central Middle Ages: 1000-1300
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • General Editor's Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Contributors xiii
  • Introduction: The Many Italies of the Middle Ages 1
  • Part I - Rulers and Subjects 25
  • 1: Cities and Communes 27
  • 2: Law and Monarchy in the South 58
  • 3: Papal Italy 82
  • 4: The Rise of the Signori 104
  • Part II - Social Change and the Commercial Revolution 125
  • 5: Trade and Navigation 127
  • 6: Material Life 147
  • 7: Rural Italy 161
  • 8: The Family 183
  • 9: Language and Culture 197
  • Part III - The Other Faces of Italy 213
  • 10: The Italian Other 215
  • 11: Sardinia and Italy 237
  • Conclusion 251
  • Further Reading 255
  • Glossary 271
  • Chronology 275
  • Map Section 282
  • Index 287
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