Teaching Lifetime Sports

By Lawrence F. Butler | Go to book overview

7
Mountain Biking

THE NATURE OF MOUNTAIN BIKING

Mountain biking, also known as all-terrain or off-road biking, has grown tremendously over the last decade and is one of the best examples of a true lifetime sport. All-terrain bikes began appearing in the 1970's and participation has increased dramatically. Most people grow up learning how to ride a bike, and this activity offers the added adventure of exploring wooded trails and getting away from it all. Children learn to ride because it is fun; adults often continue to ride for basic transportation, fun, or the added benefit of developing their level of physical fitness. Many adults enjoy cycling and return to this activity because of the fun they had as a child. The beauty of mountain biking is that it can be done alone, with a friend or family, or as part of an organized cycling group.

Mountain bikes are able to take us on journeys that were never dreamed of and provide outdoor fun and enjoyment. In addition, cycling also provides us with another low impact activity.


INSTRUCTIONAL AREA

Basic instruction can occur in any number of places. In school settings, open parking lots are a good place to start for beginners as they learn to master the basics of shifting gears, turning, and stopping. This can naturally progress to local residential areas that are relatively free of traffic. Ideally, the next progression is to wooded trails. Many public school or university settings have trails that are located either on campus or in the local community. In addition, there are state, regional, and national biking trails located throughout the United States.

-101-

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Teaching Lifetime Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Part One 1
  • 1: Introduction 3
  • 2: Basic Teaching Skills 13
  • Part Two 45
  • 3: Fitness Walking 47
  • 4: Running 59
  • 5: Exercising with Equipment 71
  • 6: In-Line Skating 91
  • 7: Mountain Biking 101
  • 8: Volleyball 111
  • 9: Tennis 123
  • 10: Swimming 149
  • Appendix 163
  • Index 165
  • About the Author and Contributors 169
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