Gustav Mahler's Symphonies: Critical Commentary on Recordings since 1986

By Lewis M. Smoley | Go to book overview

SYMPHONY NO. 7 IN E MINOR
("SONG OF THE NIGHT")
Movements:
1. Langsam - Allegro con fuoco
2. Nachtmusik I: Allegro moderato
3. Scherzo: Schattenhaft. Fliessend, aber nicht schnell.
4. Nachtmusik II: Andante amoroso
5. Rondo Finale. Allegro ordinario

ABBADO, CLAUDIO/Chicago Symphony - 2-DG 413773–2 GH2 (1985); 10-DG 447 023 (1995) "78:27" *+ Abbado turns in one of the best performances in his entire cycle. Playing is strong and sharp, details carefully rendered and tempo settings and modulations wellconceived. The first movement makes a strong impression generally, although it sometimes lacks vigor and spontaneity and sounds too consciously artful (an awkward affectation at m.245 is evidence of the latter). Nachtmusik I seems slightly restrained and mellow, but Abbado's attentiveness to details brings out subtle nuances. Notice the marvelous echo effect made by placing the horns antiphonally in the opening measures. Muffled cowbells produce a choked rather than distant sound. The Scherzo movement is set at a brisk pace, breezing through the interweaving triplets too quickly to elicit a mysterious atmosphere. Otherwise, Abbado balances inner voices deftly. Also in quick tempo, Nachtmusik II is treated more like a bright, lively ditty than a moonlit serenade. Some more relaxed moments, such as at # 202–207, only highlight Abbado's animated reading. If much of the music up to this point seems to lack involvement, despite the spirited tempo, Abbado releases a torrent of energy and intensity in the boisterous finale. His conception of tempi (a very essential element in the overall design) is excellent, particularly in his treatment of the grazioso segments. He seems to lose control as the tempo presses forward too quickly, spoiling the parodistic altvaterisch (old-fashioned) sections intended as a spoof on the classical style. Toward the close, Abbado maintains just the right attitude in his tongue-in-cheek treatment of repeated false cadences. One would wish for less noisy bells at #293 and a true a tempo at #296 (played for some reason very slowly). Mahler's unorthodox reversal of a typical final chord (a diminuendo instead of a crescendo leading to a final loud stroke) is timed perfectly. Sonics are clear but strings need more brilliance and bass could be better focussed.

ABRAVANEL, MAURICE/Utah Symphony - 2-Vanguard VSD 71141/2 (1966); 11Vanguard 08.4013.79 (1995) "77:48" This performance begins quite well but with each movement it gradually deteriorates until it reaches its nadir in the finale. The first movement

-167-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gustav Mahler's Symphonies: Critical Commentary on Recordings since 1986
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Symphony No. 1 in D Major ("Titan") 1
  • Symphony No. 2 in C Minor ("Resurrection") 33
  • Symphony No. 3 in D Minor 59
  • Symphony No. 4 in G Major 81
  • Symphony No. 5 in C-Sharp Minor 107
  • Symphony No. 6 in a Minor ("Tragic") 141
  • Symphony No. 7 in E Minor ("Song of the Night") 167
  • Symphony No. 8 in E-Flat Major ("Symphony of a Thousand") 189
  • Das Lied Von der Erde 205
  • Symphony No. 9 in D Major 225
  • Symphony No. 10 in F-Sharp Major (Unfinished) 255
  • Bibliography 268
  • Index to Conductors 269
  • Index to Orchestras 284
  • Index to Soloists 298
  • Index to Choruses 322
  • Index to Record Labels 334
  • About the Author 355
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.