Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies

By Robert G. O'Meally; Brent Hayes Edwards et al. | Go to book overview

Contributors

Herman Beavers is associate professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. He did his undergraduate work at Oberlin College and his graduate work at Brown and Yale, where he received his doctorate in American Studies in 1990. He is the author of two books, A Neighborhood of Feeling (Doris, 1986), a chapbook of poems, and Wrestling Angels Into Song: The Fictions of Ernest". Gaines and James Alan McPherson(University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995). He is currently at work on And Bid Him Sing, which examines representations of susceptibility and shame in twentieh-century African American writing by black male writers, and he has completed a collection of poems entitled "Still Life with Guitar." In the summer of 2001 he was a distinguished visiting scholar at the University of Kansas. He was a visiting fellow in African American Studies at Princeton University for the 2001–2 academic year. Born and raised in the Cleveland, Ohio area, he now lives in Burlington, New Jersey with his wife, Lisa, their son, Michael, and their daughter, Corinne.

Brent Hayes Edwards is associate professor in the Department of English at Rutgers University. He is the author of The Practice of Diaspora: Literature, Translation, and the Rise of Black Internationalism (Harvard University Press, 2003). Coeditor of the journal Social Text, he also serves on the editorial boards of Transition and Callaloo.

Krin Gabbard is professor of Comparative Literature and English at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is the author of Black Magic: White Hollywood and African American Culture(Rutgers University Press, 2004) and Jammin' at the Margins: Jazz and the American Cinema (University of Chicago Press, 1996) and the editor of Jazz Among the Discourses and Representing Jazz (both Duke University Press, 1995).

Kevin Gaines teaches in the history department and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Uplifting the Race:

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