New Age and Neopagan Religions in America

By Sarah M. Pike | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY
1838Phineas Parkhurst Quimby encounters mesmerist Charles Poyen in Belfast, Maine and begins his spiritual healing career.
1848Spiritualism begins when the Fox sisters of Hydesville, New York report hearing mysterious rappings in their house.
1875Helena Petrovna Blavatsky and Henry Steel Olcott form the Theosophical Society in New York City.
1888The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn begins meeting in England.
1893The World's Parliament of Religions is held in Chicago, introducing American citizens to Asian religions and cultures.
1910Aleister Crowley joins the Ordo Templi Orientis (Oriental Templar Order or OTO), which he heads from 1922 to 1947; he incorporates many of his own teachings into its systems of initiation. The OTO continues to be an influential branch of Neopaganism.
1915AMORC (Ancient and Mystical Order of the Rosae Crucis), an early Rosicrucian group, is founded in New York City.
1931The Association for Research and Enlightenment (ARE) is founded to disseminate the teachings of psychic Edgar Cayce.
1947Kenneth Arnold, a U.S. Forest Service employee sent to look for a downed plane in Washington State, reports seeing nine brightly lit, spherically shaped flying objects near Mount Rainier and sets off decades of speculation about UFOs.
1949Gerald Gardner's High Magic's Aid, a fictionalized account of a witch coven, is published.

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