Biological Weapons: From the Invention of State-Sponsored Programs to Contemporary Bioterrorism

By Jeanne Guillemin | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abramova, Faina, 142
accidents. See Safety issues and accidents
ACTD (Advanced Concept Technology Demonstrations) exercises, 179–80
Ad Hoc Group for BWC protocol, 147, 148, 191
aerial warfare: advocated in hope of shortening wars, 6; Allied plans for biological warfare attacks similar to “carpet” bombings of WWII, 7; and enemy civilians, 1; French development of aerosol bombs, 21
aerosols: belief in having little battlefield utility, 7; considered most efficient means of distribution, 14–15; definition of, 2; difficulties of dose response calculation, 9, 98; French work with, 25; localized, vii; requirements for efficient munitions, 22on33; respirable, problems generating, 98; technical goal for dissemination, 103
Afghanistan, 14, 160, 169
Agent Orange, 70, 128
agents: binary nerve, 124, 125; cited as possible weapons for use against humans, 31–33t; criteria for selection of, 30; definition of, 3; nonlethal, 7, 113; riot–control, 94, 113–14, 115–16, 124, 125, 128, 156, 222m6; select, 2, 34–36
AIDS epidemic, 157
AIDS medications, 190
Akratanakul, Pongtep, 139
Albright, Madeleine, 160
Algeria, 25
Al Hakam, Iraq, 153, 154
Alibek, Ken, 134, 137, 142, 146
Al Qaeda (“the Base”), 18, 159–60, 167
American biological weapons program. See United States' biological/chemical weapons program
anthrax: adverse effects of vaccinations, 143; aerosol chamber experiments on laboratory animals, 64; affecting both humans and animals, 36; animals tested upon, 102; attempts by American extremist to create weapon, 158; Aum Shinrikyo plans to use, 158; bomb compared to atomic weapons, 12; in cattle cakes, 51, 69, 212n28; as cause of animal outbreaks, 30; contingency plans for use on German cities, 69; cutaneous, human–subjects testing by US, 106; deaths in felt–making factory, 106; deaths of workers from, 121; determination of approximate lethal dose for sheep, 55; difficulty of decontamination, 34, 66; DRES experiments on dispersal, 173; estimates of bomb effectiveness, 64; failed attempts at development of vaccine and antigens, 68; as favored candidate for research, 15, 29; German infection of pack animals during WWI, 5, 21, 40; human–subjects testing by Japanese, 79, 86–87, 142; industrial bomb production by UK, 65–66; inhalational, incubation period discoveries, 142–43;

-243-

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