Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Avant-Garde: War, Civilization, Modernity

By Christine Froula | Go to book overview

NOTES

Preface

1. See Hannah Arendt, On Revolution (1965; New York: Penguin, 1979), chap. 6 ("The Revolutionary Tradition and Its Lost Treasure"), esp. section 3, 249–55. "Permanent revolution": Marshall Berman, All That Is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1982), 95.

2. Perry Anderson, "Modernity and Revolution," New Left Review 144 (March-April 1984): 102.

3. Philippe Sollers, Writing and the Experience of Limits, ed. David Hayman, trans. Philip Bernard and David Hayman (1968; New York: Columbia UP, 1983), 40–41 (translation modified). See Hannah Arendt, Lectures on Kant's Political Philosophy, ed. with an interpretive essay by Ronald Beiner (Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1982), 115.

4. Berman, All That Is Solid, 95–96.

5. E. g., the extensive writings of Jürgen Habermas, which seek to preserve and extend the emancipatory dimension and successes of the Enlightenment project while criticizing new forms of domination produced by it; Roy Porter, Enlightenment: Britain and the Creation of the Modern World (London: Allen Lane/Penguin, 2000); Sankar Muthu, Enlightenment Against Empire (Princeton: Princeton UP, 2003); Pamela Cheek, Sexual Antipodes: Enlightenment, Globalization, and the Placing of Sex (Stanford: Stanford UP, 2003); What's Left of Enlightenment? A Postmodern Question, ed. K. M. Baker and P. H. Reill (Stanford: Stanford UP, 2001); Robert C. Bartlett, The Idea of Enlightenment: A Post-Mortem Study (Toronto: U of Toronto P, 2001); Neil Postman, Building a Bridge to the Eighteenth Century: How the Past Can Improve Our Future (New York: Knopf, 2000); Anthony Cascardi, Consequences of Enlightenment (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999); Geography and Enlightenment, ed. D. N. Livingstone and C. W. J. Withers (Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1999); Marie Fleming, Emancipation and Illusion: Rationality and Gender in Habermas's Theory of Modernity (University Park: Pennsylvania State UP, 1997); Race and the Enlightenment, ed. E. C. Eze (Oxford: Blackwell, 1997); Karlis Racevskis, Postmodernism and the Search for Enlightenment (Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1993).


1. Civilization and "my civilisation": Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury
Avant-Garde

1. "In the decade before the 1914 war there was a political and social movement in the world, and particularly in Europe and Britain, which seemed at the

-325-

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