Montessori: The Science behind the Genius

By Angeline Stoll Lillard | Go to book overview

8: Adult Interaction Styles
and Child Outcomes

It is true that the child develops in his environment through
activity itself, but he needs material means, guidance and an
indispensable understanding. It is the adult who provides these
necessities. . . . If "the adult" does less than is necessary, the child
cannot act meaningfully, and if he does more than is necessary,
he imposes himself upon the child, extinguishing "the child's"
creative impulses.

—MARIA MONTESSORI (1956, p. 154)

The texts I know for traditional teachers from the early 1900s are not particularly specific about how teachers should behave toward children. Proponents of the factory model repeatedly refer to the teacher as a worker, on a par with a factory employee, who is expected to mechanically perform the function of running efficient classrooms that will enable children to pass exams at minimal expense to the taxpayers. Efficiency was key, and the instructions as to how to run the classroom were provided by the school administrator.

Behaviorist approaches, notably that of Thorndike, specified that the teacher's role was to establish useful bonds in the child's mind and eliminate useless and negative ones. Being businesslike was important in this approach as well; such concepts as "emotional warmth" do not figure prominently in behaviorist discourse; in the rare instances when Thorndike mentions emotional qualities for a teacher, it tends to be in a footnote (e.g., Thorndike, 1906/1962, p. 63). Thorndike's recommendation for how a teacher should give instructions, for example, was to say, "Do the work on this page. Do it again, keeping track of how many minutes you spend. Practice again until you can get all the answers right in 12 minutes" (Thorndike, 1921b, p. 17). Communication was to be simple, direct, and dry. Beyond a few such mentions, the literature reflecting the factory and empty-vessel

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Montessori: The Science behind the Genius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Notes on the Book xiii
  • Contents xv
  • Montessori 1
  • 1: An Answer to the Crisis in Education 3
  • 2: The Impact of Movement on Learning and Cognition 38
  • 3: Choice and Perceived Control 80
  • 4: Interest in Human Learning 114
  • 5: Extrinsic Rewards and Motivation 152
  • 6: Learning from Peers 192
  • 7: Meaningful Contexts for Learning 224
  • 8: Adult Interaction Styles and Child Outcomes 257
  • 9: Order in Environment and Mind 289
  • 10: Education for Children 325
  • Works Cited 347
  • Name Index 379
  • Subject Index 389
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 404

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.