Death by Design: Capital Punishment as Social Psychological System

By Craig Haney | Go to book overview

Index
African American, 7, 9, 13–14, 21–23, 106, 114, 153, 189–209, 238. See also racial discrimination; racism posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 197
aggravation, 65, 111–114, 127, 148–151, 224, 229
comprehension of, 167–188, 234–236
definition of, 20
failure to explain, 134–135
media portrayal of, 54, 57, 217
and race, 205–207
sensationalization of, 49
structural aggravation, 143, 160, 243
weighing, 76, 78
Alabama, 19
American Bar Association, 197
American Revolution, 13
Amsterdam, Anthony, 203
Attitudes
criminal justice, 59, 61, 73
crime control, 108–111, 139
death penalty opposition, 87, 101102, 104, 116–119, 128–138, 175, 213, 224, 243
death penalty support, 6, 38, 61–62, 68, 70–75, 80, 86, 93, 109, 111, 116, 119, 128, 130–132, 134–136, 139, 158, 175–176, 211, 219, 224225, 242–243
due process, 108–109, 139, 243
attorneys
disparity of resources, 19, 21, 147, 150, 226–227
proper training in penalty phase, 5, 19, 21, 23, 147
attribution theory, 201–204
availability heuristic, 125
Baldus, David, 15, 16, 18, 19
Bandes, Susan, 218
Bandura, Albert, 143–144
Banner, Stuart, 13, 55, 211
Barthes, Roland, 6
Beckett, Katherine, 32, 34
Bedau, Hugo, 88
Benson, Carmel, 175–176, 208
Bentele, Ursula, 235
Berger, Raoul, 86
bifurcated trial process, 22, 102
penalty phase, 20–24, 48–49, 55–57, 76, 81–85, 113

-323-

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Death by Design: Capital Punishment as Social Psychological System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Series Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Contents xix
  • 1: Blinded by the Death Penalty 3
  • 2: Frameworks of Misunderstanding 27
  • 3: Constructing Capital Crimes and Defendants 45
  • 4: The Fragile Consensus 67
  • 5: A Tribunal Organized to Convict and Execute? 93
  • 6: Preparing for the Death Penalty in Advance of Trial 115
  • 7: Structural Aggravation 141
  • 8: Misguided Discretion 163
  • 9: Condemning the Other 189
  • 10: No Longer Tinkering with the Machinery of Death 211
  • Concluding Thoughts: Death Is Different 241
  • Notes 247
  • Index 323
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