Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Baker Street

By Janet B. Pascal | Go to book overview

FURTHER READING

The best source for information on Arthur Conan Doyle is his own autobiography, Memories and Adventures. All his letters and papers have been tied up in lawsuits and unavailable since the early 1930s, shortly after his death. Only John Lamond, John Dickson Carr, and Pierre Nordon were able to see these papers before they were withdrawn. Every biography that has been published since that time has been restricted to the material they quoted.


WORKS ABOUT ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE
AND SHERLOCK HOLMES

Baring-Gould,William Stuart. Sherlock Holmes of Baker Street:The Life of the World's First Consulting Detective. New York: Random House, 1995.A [biography] of the great detective.

Carr, John Dickson. The Life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. London: John Murray; New York: Harper, 1949. Carr, a mystery writer, collaborated with Adrian Conan Doyle on several Sherlock Holmes adventures. His entertaining biography reads like a novel and is not strictly factual.

Cooke, Ivan, ed. The Return of Arthur Conan Doyle. Liss, Hampshire, England:White Eagle Publishing Trust, 1980. Part two of this book,[The Message of Arthur Conan Doyle,] was supposedly written by Arthur Conan Doyle after his death, through the medium Grace Cooke.

Costello, Peter. The Real World of Sherlock Holmes:The True Crimes Investigated by Arthur Conan Doyle. New York: Carroll & Graf, 1991.

Doyle,Adrian Conan. The True Conan Doyle. New York: CowardMcCann, 1946.Adrian Conan Doyle wrote this pamphlet to refute Hesketh Pearson's biography of his father, in which, he believed, Pearson had belittled Arthur Conan Doyle.

Edwards, Owen Dudley. The Quest for Sherlock Holmes:A Biographical Study of Arthur Conan Doyle. Totowa, N.J.: Barnes & Noble, 1983.

Hall,Trevor H., with contributions by Charles O. Ellison. Sherlock Holmes and His Creator. London: Duckworth, 1978.

Higham, Charles. The Adventures of Conan Doyle:The Life of the

-151-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arthur Conan Doyle: Beyond Baker Street
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.