Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War

By Catherine Clinton; Nina Silber | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Thomas J. Brown is Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Institute for Southern Studies at the University of South Carolina. He is the author of Dorothea Dix, New England Reformer (1998), the editor of The Public Art of Civil War Commemoration: A Brief History with Docu- ments (2004), and coeditor, with Martin H. Blatt and Donald Yacovone, of Hope and Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Regi- ment (2001).

Lisa Cardyn received her Ph.D. and J.D. degrees from Yale University, where she is now a Research Affiliate at the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. She is currently revising the manuscript of her first book, a study of sexual terror and the Reconstruction klans. Her next project, tentatively titled The Trials of Evelyn Nesbit, takes up the contested meanings of sexualized violence in the context of one of the most notorious “crimes of passion” of the last century—Harry Thaw's murder of the architect Stanford White. It is the subject of her most recent article, “Spectacles of Sex and Violence in Old New York: The Nesbit-Thaw-White Affair,” published in 2004.

Catherine Clinton is the author and editor of over twenty books, most recently Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom and Hold the Flag High (an illustrated book for young readers). She is currently working on a biography of Mary Todd Lincoln.

Jim Downs earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania; and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He is revising his dissertation, “Diagnosing Reconstruction: The History of the Medical Division of the Freedmen's Bureau,” for publication. Downs is the coeditor of Taking Back the Academy: History of Activism, History as Activism (2004), and the editor of Why We Write (2005). He has published articles

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