Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War

By Catherine Clinton; Nina Silber | Go to book overview

10
THE CONFEDERATE RETREAT
TO MARS AND VENUS

Thomas J. Brown

They are a study in the art of contrast. The marble statue to the fallen Confederate soldiers of South Carolina stands in front of the principal entrance to the state capitol (fig. 1). Leaning on his rifle as he looks directly down Main Street from a height of forty feet, he commands the precise point at which the channels of government and business power meet in Columbia. The bronze statue to the Confederate women of South Carolina sits diametrically across from the State House, about an equal distance from the building, in a chair on a low pedestal (fig. 2). With her back to the street, surrounded on three sides by shrubbery atop a restraining wall, she looks up from the Bible resting on her lap. The carefully coordinated inscriptions on the two monuments underscore that the models of virtue shared an abiding commitment to the Lost Cause. The men were “TRUE TO THE INSTINCTS OF THEIR BIRTH, / FAITHFUL TO THE TEACHINGS OF THEIR FATHERS, / CONSTANT IN THEIR LOVE FOR THE STATE,” and the women were “UNCHANGED IN THEIR DEVOTION, / UNSHAKEN IN THEIR PATRIOTISM, / UNWEARIED IN MINISTRATIONS, / UNCOMPLAINING IN SACRIFICES.” The inscriptions also emphasize that this common loyalty provided a basis for mutual respect and affection. The soldiers monument declares that it has been “ERECTED BY THE WOMEN OF SOUTH CAROLINA”; the monument to women answers that it was “REARED BY THE MEN OF THE STATE.” Together, the monuments to the exemplary Confederate man and the exemplary Confederate woman naturalize the South Carolina State House—their house—and situate the

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Battle Scars: Gender and Sexuality in the American Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.