China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education

By Bob Adamson | Go to book overview

6 Modernization under Deng Xiaoping,
1977–93

The demise of the Cultural Revolution marked the end of a period of relative isolation, both political and economic, for China. Mao's designated successor was Hua Guofeng, who was viewed as a conciliatory figure, capable of bringing together the factions that had polarized in the latter years of the Cultural Revolution (Short, 1982). He reactivated a number of economic policies, most notably the Four Modernizations Programme, first elucidated by Lin Biao in 1959, which targeted agriculture, science and technology, defence and industry. In the event, Hua's tenure of power proved to be just a brief interregnum and in 1978 Deng Xiaoping took control as the paramount leader of China and instigated economic reforms. The new directions in policy were boosted by rapprochement with the USA. The exchange of ambassadors was announced on 16 December 1978, and shortly afterwards, Deng visited the USA. According to Philip Short, a journalist stationed in Beijing at that time, Deng's visit triggered an upsurge of interest in the USA:

As though at the turn of a giant switch, the Chinese press, which a few months
earlier had been depicting American life in terms of alcoholism and divorce,
strikes and racial tension, printed stories about Disneyland, and photographs
of Deng and his entourage disappearing under ten-gallon stetsons at a Texas
rodeo. Through television, John Denver, Shirley MacLaine and the Harlem
Globetrotters made their way into Chinese homes and community centres. A
documentary on American life showed … a wedding party in a Chinese
restaurant in New York, at which the young Chinese bride, looking shyly at
her American husband, said she hoped relations between the two countries
would prosper as her own new Chinese-American marriage. For a country
where, a year earlier, Deng had had to intervene personally to authorise the
first marriage between a foreigner and a Chinese for more than a decade, it
would be hard to find a more emotion-charged symbolism for the new
attitudes being created. (Short, 1982: 296)

Education was perceived by the CCP as playing a crucial role in the Four Modernizations, as the government embraced human resource development.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China's English: A History of English in Chinese Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Series Editor's Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Note on Transliteration xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Barbarian as a Foreign Language 21
  • 3: The Soviet Influence, 1949–60 35
  • 4: Towards Quality in Education, 1961–66 79
  • 5: The Cultural Revolution, 1966–76 107
  • 6: Modernization under Deng Xiaoping, 1977–93 129
  • 7: Integrating with Globalization, 1993 Onwards 169
  • 8: China's English 195
  • Appendix 211
  • Notes 215
  • References 219
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.