Organizing for Learning in the Primary Classroom: A Balanced Approach to Classroom Management

By Janet R. Moyles | Go to book overview

Introduction:
Polarizations and balance

Picture the scene: a lively classroom full of motivated and interesting children, some painting canal boats, a group doing science experiments, a few arguing over the solution to a mathematical problem, a group reading in a cosily furnished alcove just off the main area, a cluster of children around the teacher in eager discussion and yet more playing a geography game with another adult. Two other children are moving around the school doing a survey on school dinner preferences and one child is drafting a story on the computer. Everything is calm and orderly and throughout the day children move in and out of various activities, having whole class sessions with the teacher, talking to each other in group and individual situations, working with or alongside the adults in the room, putting materials away, obtaining resources for different activities and interacting in a range of experiences, some of which provide new learning while others provide for the continuous development of existing understanding.

Primary teachers will recognize this scenario and may well think 'So what? Just a normal class on a normal day!' But the underlying systems which have previously been formed are crucial to everything which occurs in that classroom on that day. They go unsung and unnoticed by everyone much of the time, being part of the routines and rituals of primary education. Primary teachers make classroom organization and management look easy – as any student teacher, who has tried to disentangle the strategies used by experienced teachers in maintaining order within the classroom,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Organizing for Learning in the Primary Classroom: A Balanced Approach to Classroom Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction: Polarizations and Balance 1
  • 1: Teachers and Teaching 11
  • 2: The Learning Environment 34
  • 3: The Children and Their Learning Needs 64
  • 4: Grouping Children for Teaching and Learning 88
  • 5: Time for Teaching and Learning 112
  • 6: Deploying Adult Help Effectively in the Classroom 136
  • 7: Evaluating Classroom Organization and Management 153
  • 8: Conclusion 179
  • References 185
  • Index 194
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 199

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.