Organizing for Learning in the Primary Classroom: A Balanced Approach to Classroom Management

By Janet R. Moyles | Go to book overview

5
Time for teaching
and learning

Whether to organise for whole class teaching and learning, for group or individual activities is highly dependent upon the classroom and school context, the children, the learning intentions, the individual teacher's style and approach and, above all, time factors. An attempt to cover the entire legislated curriculum with each individual child in the time allotted within the normal working day is bound to fail and leave teachers feeling somewhat less than enthusiastic and proactive. Time, as the modern world perceives it, is finite, particularly the school day. What to leave out becomes more important than what to retain. In relation to the notion of balance, which has pervaded previous chapters, the concept of time is incompatible, for it rarely balances adequately with what we want to achieve. For primary teachers, their work may be pursued long hours into non-directed time (Campbell et al., 1991) – and it is a mark of their professionalism and concern for children that so many of them have been prepared to sustain this without antagonism in an attempt to meet unprecedented legislative demands.

Now that the main curriculum requirements are known, it is perhaps the right moment to think proactively about the question of the time needed to fit everything in, for as suggested by Ball et al. (1984: 57):

… empirically, conceptually and theoretically, time has been
virtually ignored by sociologists of education as a phenomenal

-112-

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Organizing for Learning in the Primary Classroom: A Balanced Approach to Classroom Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction: Polarizations and Balance 1
  • 1: Teachers and Teaching 11
  • 2: The Learning Environment 34
  • 3: The Children and Their Learning Needs 64
  • 4: Grouping Children for Teaching and Learning 88
  • 5: Time for Teaching and Learning 112
  • 6: Deploying Adult Help Effectively in the Classroom 136
  • 7: Evaluating Classroom Organization and Management 153
  • 8: Conclusion 179
  • References 185
  • Index 194
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