Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching

By Florence Beetlestone | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I am particularly indebted to my own children, my nephews David and Andrew, and to the many children I have taught at the Claremont Pre-School Playgroup, Broadwater Farm Nursery, Devonshire Hill Primary and Culloden Primary. I owe a debt to all the children, parents, teachers and head teachers I have worked with over the years and who have collectively given me insight, understanding and a bank of experience and examples to draw upon. There have been many creative individuals among them.

My students at the University of Greenwich, whether on BEd, PGCE or inservice programmes, have clarified my vision of what quality teaching is all about: in exploring the complexities of teaching and learning with them, I have come to understand the processes more fully. I thank them for their energy, enthusiasm and commitment.

Thanks must also be expressed to colleagues at Avery Hill, particularly those in the Early Years Team, who have always been personally very supportive and encouraging. I also owe a debt of gratitude to the educational authorities which have provided the creative framework for the schools in which I have worked, particularly the London Boroughs of Enfield, Haringey, Tower Hamlets and Greenwich, and those in Sweden and Norway.

I would also like to thank the series editor, Janet Moyles, who has supported and encouraged my work throughout the writing of this book, and Shona Mullen, who has carefully and thoughtfully guided its production from the early stages.

It is difficult to single out individuals, but special thanks are

-xvii-

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