Creative Children, Imaginative Teaching

By Florence Beetlestone | Go to book overview

4
'I don't know if she's naughty
or just a nonconformist'
Creativity and the imagination

Cameo I

Seven-year-old Ellie is writing about oranges: 'My orange is round
and orange and the juice is sweet It smells orangey.' Jodie writes:
The juice of the orange is nice. You can use it to dye things
orange. It stained my T-shirt and my Mum couldn't get it out'


Cameo 2

David, 13 years old, is asked what he thinks creative people are
like. 'Someone who makes things with their hands, creating
things, building something and knowing what it would be no
matter what the materials are. Something is built that everyone
can see.' He describes art as 'A different way of creating, using
paper — artists are more quiet people, they keep things to
themselves.' Janet his teacher, expresses her view: 'Creative
children are confident enthusiastic, motivated, full of ideas,
capable of self-expression; the type of children who will use any
resource available to express an idea, responding imaginatively
irrespective of level of skill. They approach activities in a free
unpredictable way, often producing something different to what
the teacher had in mind.'


Cameo 3

A Year I class begin their topic on citrus fruits by looking at a
Clementine. They spend a morning looking at the external
features, hypothesizing about what it will look like inside, the

-75-

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