Family Focused Grief Therapy: A Model of Family-Centered Care during Palliative Care and Bereavement

By David W. Kissane; Sidney Bloch | Go to book overview

Series editor's preface

I first met David Kissane, one of the authors of this book, in Sheffield in 1996. During his short visit he gave a lecture at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital on work with Sidney Bloch (his co-author here) in formulating, providing and evaluating a remarkable palliative care service for families in Melbourne, Australia. Here indeed was a team which took seriously the idea that in palliative care it is the entire family which should be supported. Their work appeared to offer a new model of grief therapy, which began whilst the person called the 'patient' was still alive and continued with the bereaved family members in the period after death. The project was being developed with remarkable energy and rigour and I had no hesitation in inviting those concerned to write a book about it for the Facing Death series. David Kissane and Sidney Bloch have done this in a work which both has something new to say and does so in the most lucid manner. I commend it to all palliative care workers (and not only those specialized in bereavement) as well as to those responsible for palliative care service development and evaluation.

Family Focused Grief Therapy by David Kissane and Sidney Bloch is the tenth volume to appear in the Facing Death series. So it marks a useful point at which to reconsider the aims of the series and to reflect on progress to date. From modest beginnings we now have a rich and expanding array of titles and a growing reputation for high quality writing and clarity of presentation. Our tenth volume is therefore cause for a modest sense of achievement and for celebration.

It was the interest attracted by my first book for Open University Press, The Future for Palliative Care: Issues of Policy and Practice (Clark (ed.) 1993) which led to initial discussions with Jacinta Evans about a series which might further develop this area of interest. That was in 1995. As the

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