Family Focused Grief Therapy: A Model of Family-Centered Care during Palliative Care and Bereavement

By David W. Kissane; Sidney Bloch | Go to book overview

2 A typology of family
functioning

Grief is a recurring emotion experienced during a cancer journey since many loss events arise as health fails and lifestyle adjustment is needed. A family model of grief is inherently appealing because of the shared nature of the experience. Our review thus far has pointed to different apparent patterns of family response which, in broad terms, can be adaptive or maladaptive, the latter involving avoidance of grief, its distortion (e.g. anger, blame, despair), amplification or prolongation (Kissane 1994). These patterns are strikingly similar to the attachment styles of a child – secure or insecure (avoidant, ambivalent or disorganized subtypes) (Ainsworth and Eichberg 1991). Will it prove possible to confirm these conceptual categories through empirical research?

In this chapter, we provide a brief account of the research in which we observed cohorts of grieving families and sought to classify them in terms of their functioning. Our key objectives were to develop a typology of families with respect to grief outcome and to demonstrate links between type and psychosocial morbidity. The latter is critical to a family approach since clinicians would not want to miss the vulnerable individual because the family appeared well functioning. We needed to prove that dysfunctional families carry significantly more morbidity to justify targeting resources specifically in their direction.


Methodology in the Melbourne family grief studies

First, we examined one cohort of 102 families (342 subjects) recruited from the oncology department of a metropolitan general hospital in Melbourne. All patients had cancer, were aged 40 to 65 years, and were deemed to have

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Family Focused Grief Therapy: A Model of Family-Centered Care during Palliative Care and Bereavement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.