Family Focused Grief Therapy: A Model of Family-Centered Care during Palliative Care and Bereavement

By David W. Kissane; Sidney Bloch | Go to book overview

Notes on the authors

David Kissane graduated as a medical practitioner from the University of Melbourne, Australia, in 1974, completed his Master of Psychological Medicine at Monash University in 1991 and his Doctorate of Medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1995. He was awarded Fellowships of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners in 1980, the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists in 1991 and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, Chapter of Palliative Medicine, in 2000. He worked in private general practice for 8 years before training in psychiatry, was Lecturer (1992–1993) and Senior Lecturer (19941995) in Psychiatry at Monash University, and specialized in Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry with particular interests in psycho-oncology and palliative care. He was appointed Professor/Director of Palliative Medicine at the University of Melbourne in 1996, directing the Centre for Palliative Care, formed by a consortium of health care providers, including The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute (a tertiary referral cancer hospital in Melbourne), St Vincent's Hospital (a general hospital with associated Clinical School), Caritas Christi Hospice (an inpatient hospice), and Mercy Hospice, Melbourne Citymission and Eastern Palliative Care (three communitybased palliative care services). He is also a Professorial Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Melbourne, Associate of the Department of Psychological Medicine at Monash University, President of the International PsychoOncology Society, Chairman of the Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Section of the College of Psychiatry, serves on the editorial boards of several journals, and is an author of over 100 monographs, chapters and refereed journal publications. This is his first book, which is a natural extension of his doctoral research into family bereavement. His other research interests include psychotherapy interventions during cancer care, including group therapy for breast cancer patients; observational studies of men with prostate cancer; demoralization and its treatment; the ethics of end-of-life decision-making; and communication studies.

Sidney Bloch graduated as a medical practitioner from the University of Cape Town, South Africa in 1964, completed a PhD at the University of Melbourne in 1972 and was awarded Fellowships of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in 1986 and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists in 1989. He was a Harkness Fellow at Stanford University 1973–1975, Clinical Lecturer and Consultant Psychiatrist at the Warneford Hospital, University of Oxford, 1976–1988 and Reader in Psychiatry, University of Melbourne and Senior Psychiatrist at St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne 1989–1999. He was appointed to a Personal Chair in Psychiatry and as Adjunct Professor in the Centre for the Study of Health and Society at the University of Melbourne in 1999. He has served as editor of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry since 1992, has published eleven books and over 160 chapters and journal articles. His book titles include Russia's Political Hospitals (Gollancz 1977) [which won the Guttmacher Award of the American Psychiatric Association in 1978]; Soviet Psychiatric Abuse (Gollancz 1984); An Introduction to the Psychotherapies (OUP 1996, 3rd edn); What is Psychotherapy? (OUP 1982); Psychiatric Ethics (OUP 1999, 3rd edn); Therapeutic Factors

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