Being a Teacher in Higher Education

By Peter T. Knight | Go to book overview

7
Instruction

A stance
Being a teacher almost always involves being an instructor, which usually means being a lecturer, which often means presenting students with lots of information. Students need information, but they also need to understand it – to assimilate it to their existing webs of meaning or to accommodate their webs to it. Presentations can be admirable ways of supporting understanding, although it is doubtful whether they are a very good way to communicate large amounts of information. Now that information and communication technology (ICT) is commonplace, it might be said that face-to-face presentation, whatever its purpose, has become obsolete and that being a teacher should now mean being an on-line instructor. I support the idea behind this – that good teaching involves the design of varied learning environments full of affordances for stimulating engagements – but not the claim that modern teaching, learning and assessment should normally be done on-line. We must keep face-to-face learning. That understood, on-line and face-to-face teachers are still in the business of supporting student understanding through sound instructional practices, good task setting and creating plenty of feedback for learners. This chapter contains research findings about instructional practices that students value and/or which correlate with good learning outcomes, with some consideration of on-line instruction. The next two chapters concentrate on task setting and feedback.
Key points
1. Teaching, described in Table II.1 as a combination of instruction, task setting and creating feedback, can be further analysed into a pre-active, interactive and post-active practices.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Being a Teacher in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part 1 - People, Times and Places 1
  • 1: Being at Work in Higher Education 3
  • 2: Learning Teachers, Learning Students 22
  • 3: Being a New Teacher 37
  • 4: Feeling Motivated 54
  • 5: Maintaining Teaching Vitality 72
  • 6: Part-Time Teaching 86
  • Part 2 - Teaching Practices 99
  • 7: Instruction 104
  • 8: Learning Tasks 124
  • 9: Creating Feedback 143
  • 10: Designing for Learning 160
  • 11: Getting Good Evaluations 178
  • Part 3 - Times of Change 187
  • 12: Change, Experiencing Change and Making Change Happen 189
  • 13: Managing Your Career 199
  • 14: Being a Teacher in Higher Education 215
  • References 220
  • Index 233
  • The Society for Research into Higher Education 246
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.