Being a Teacher in Higher Education

By Peter T. Knight | Go to book overview

13
Managing your career

A stance

The notion of 'career' formerly meant a life time of progress in the workplace, marked by greater seniority, salary and status. This assumption was disturbed in Chapters 5 and 6. Nowadays, when the idea of lifetime careers has faded in the face of fixed-term contracts, part-time work, lifelong learning and portfolio careers, 'career' cannot be supposed to be a linear progression. Plainly, people will not end their careers where they started and professionals are likely to have more authority and to earn more at the end than at the beginning. However, for many people, especially now, the rise will not be as great as the linear model of a career implied and the pathway from start to end is less likely to resemble a climb straight up the side of the career mountain than strolls along the woodland paths on its slopes. For many people careers are shaped by life decisions that lead to career breaks and sideways moves, which were typically viewed with suspicion in the old model of career. Yet sideways moves are opportunities to consolidate learning by trying to transfer it to new contexts, or to extend learning by adding new routines, refining old ones and gaining new insights. Career breaks, of which motherhood is the most common, are often said to be times of self-appraisal and mothers tend to remark on how much the experience of caring for babies and children improves their job-worthiness. And sometimes career development is considerable but hidden in the form of on-the-job learning and experimentation, as when a teacher moves from competence to excellence but, because promotion is not based on teaching excellence, the development is easily overlooked or discounted. What, then, does career management mean when some faculty are disillusioned or disengaged, many older ones realize they are stuck midway up and others choose, more or less happily, to enjoy the foothills and woodland paths?

Chapter 4 referred to the work of Herzberg and Maslow which emphasized the importance of opportunities for self-fulfilment, satisfaction and

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Being a Teacher in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part 1 - People, Times and Places 1
  • 1: Being at Work in Higher Education 3
  • 2: Learning Teachers, Learning Students 22
  • 3: Being a New Teacher 37
  • 4: Feeling Motivated 54
  • 5: Maintaining Teaching Vitality 72
  • 6: Part-Time Teaching 86
  • Part 2 - Teaching Practices 99
  • 7: Instruction 104
  • 8: Learning Tasks 124
  • 9: Creating Feedback 143
  • 10: Designing for Learning 160
  • 11: Getting Good Evaluations 178
  • Part 3 - Times of Change 187
  • 12: Change, Experiencing Change and Making Change Happen 189
  • 13: Managing Your Career 199
  • 14: Being a Teacher in Higher Education 215
  • References 220
  • Index 233
  • The Society for Research into Higher Education 246
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