African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses

By Dorie J. Gilbert; Ednita M. Wright | Go to book overview

5
African American HIV-Affected Children and
Adolescents: Intersecting Vulnerabilities

Dorie J. Gilbert

Children and adolescents are considered HIV-affected if they have experienced the death or chronic illness of one or both parents from HIV disease. The majority of these children are healthy and may also lose one or more siblings to the disease. Micheals and Levine (1992) estimated that 80,000 HIV-infected women of childbearing age in the United States who were alive in 1992 would leave approximately 125,000 to 150,000 children orphaned. However, because many HIV-infected parents are living longer due to the increased prophylactic benefits of antiretroviral treatments, a growing number of HIV-affected children and adolescents are living with a chronically ill parent or sibling. We know that African Americans have been disproportionately affected by AIDS, accounting for nearly 50 percent of AIDS cases although they represent only 13 percent of the U.S. population, with African American women accounting for 63 percent of women with AIDS and African American children representing nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of pediatric AIDS cases (CDC 2002). Consequently, the vast majority HIV-affected children and adolescents are African American.

In general, HIV-affected children and adolescents are exposed to major psychological risk factors including [stigma, secrecy, exposure to acute and chronic illness, death of parents and/or siblings, separations, losses, orphanhood, and foster home placement—all of which are often experienced in an environment of poverty, drugs, alcohol, violence, abuse] (Lewis 1995, 50). Ironically, HIV-affected children and adolescents may themselves be at high risk for HlV-infection because, in some cases, unresolved trauma and ineffective coping may result in early and unsafe sexual practices and/or experimentation with drugs. Moreover, HIV-affected African American children and adolescents contend with the additional burden of racial inequality. Compounding their exposure to multiple

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.