African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses

By Dorie J. Gilbert; Ednita M. Wright | Go to book overview

III
African American Adolescent Females: Invisible and at Risk

African American adolescents are leading the statistics when it comes to new HIV-
infection rates among adolescents in this country. The number of AIDS cases is
growing at a faster rate for African American adolescents than for any other major
ethnic group according to statistics from the CDC. Critical responses to alleviat-
ing the prevalence of AIDS in African American communities must include spe-
cial attention to our young people, both our young men and young women. Gibbs
(1988) described young black males as an [endangered species] over a decade ago,
and today this still appears to be a relevant term within the context of rising HIV-
infection rates. The chapters focus on African American females, which is not
meant to deny the existence of the males with whom they interact. Neither is it
meant to discount the sexual diversity among young African American teens. The
fastest growing population of HIV-infection is among eighteen- to twenty-five-
year-old African American young men who have sex with men. However, the
aforementioned relatively high prevalence (estimated as much as 36 percent) of
gay males of color who also engage in heterosexual sex cannot be left out of the
equation of what puts young, heterosexual African American girls at risk.

The three chapters in this section focus on young African American women. From poor, urban environments to a historically Black college campus, our young women are faced with many barriers to HIV-prevention, some of which we are still attempting to understand. Kelly, in Chapter 10, highlights the lack of inclusion of African American females in most studies of female sexuality. It appears African American females do not have sufficient information and support to construct a positive sexuality and to avoid unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. Instead, these youths tend to be heavily influenced by outwardly imposed images, much of which cast them in negatively stereotyped

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.