African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses

By Dorie J. Gilbert; Ednita M. Wright | Go to book overview

14
Focus on Solutions: Blacks Assisting Blacks Against
AIDS: Taking Care of Our Own

Dana Williams

As an African American woman directly involved in the struggle against AIDS for the last fifteen years, it is clear that the need for HIV/AIDS services organizations and agencies, which are initiated and implemented by Blacks, is imperative for the survival of our community. Unfortunately, for years we as a community have embraced the stigma, denial, and discrimination attached to the word AIDS. Now in the twenty-first century, we have witnessed the devastation of this disease across the country and the world. As AIDS ravishes our community, taking away thousands of women who are the keepers of life, we are forced to face our fears. AIDS has now become a pandemic. African Americans and other minorities are now taking the brunt of this deadly disease. With a vaccine potentially years away, treatments becoming more expensive with unknown long-term effects, and more children becoming orphaned as a result of parents dying from AIDS, we have no other recourse except to take drastic measures. Education by way of persons who come from our own communities who look like us, speak like us, and can relate to the cultural barriers that keep us from accepting our responsibility to take care of our own will be key to reducing the rates of HIV/AIDS infection. Now is the time to step up and meet the demands and challenges our communities face in dealing with this epidemic.

A number of Black-implemented programs specifically targeting African Americans are currently in operation across the country. Many are making remarkable changes in communities of color. In this focus on solutions discussion, I simply discuss the organization and programming of one such agency, Blacks Assisting Blacks against AIDS (BABAA), located in St. Louis, Missouri. The existence of such services are more concentrated in the northeastern and West Coast areas and nearest to AIDS epicenters. It is important for existing programs

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.