African American Women and HIV/AIDS: Critical Responses

By Dorie J. Gilbert; Ednita M. Wright | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

THE EDITORS

DORIE J. GILBERT, Ph.D., L.M.S.W., is Associate Professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work and a member of the School's Center for Social Work Research. Her research interest is broadly defined under the topic of stigma, more specifically investigating the cognitive, behavioral, and developmental challenges for socially stigmatized populations, with a special focus on women and persons of color living with HIV or AIDS.

She has provided community-based counseling and advocacy for women living with HIV/AIDS, and has served as a consultant on several community-based funded projects. Through the Collaborative AIDS Prevention Studies Project, funded by the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Gilbert is a Visiting Scholar at the University of California at San Francisco and is currently researching the mental health, behavioral, and social outcomes for young African American HIVaffected children. Dr. Gilbert has received funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to study the impact of race/ethnicity and cultural mistrust on antiretroviral medication adherence among HIV-positive individuals. She has additionally received HIV-related research grants from her university to conduct research on the life experiences of women living with HIV, AIDS service utilization among African American HIV-positive persons, and the psychosocial concerns HIV-positive parents with AIDS who have latency-age children. Her publications related to HIV/AIDS and vulnerable populations have appeared in journals and edited books. She is coeditor of the Journal of HIV/AIDS and So cial Services. Dr. Gilbert was an active participant in the 1997 African American Social Work Leadership Summit Meeting on HIV/AIDS in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the HIV/AIDS and Social Work Training and Research Center, and continues to advocate for organized action to address the AIDS crisis among African Americans.

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