Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes

By Billy Watkins | Go to book overview

Glossary

Apollo-Soyuz—First manned spaceflight conducted jointly by the United States and the Soviet Union during the era of detente. On July 17, 1975, the U.S. Apollo spacecraft and Soviet Soyuz vessel docked for two days of joint operations.

biological isolation garment (BIG)—A special suit worn during recovery by the first three Apollo crews to return from a lunar landing. It isolated the astronauts from earth atmosphere in case they had come in contact with lunar pathogenic bacteria.

command module—The Apollo spacecraft consisting of a working and living area for three astronauts. It is the only part of the entire vehicle that returns from space.

command service module—The compartment attached to the rear of the command module that houses the spacecraft's electrical power subsystem, reaction control engines, part of the environmental control subsystem, and main propulsion engine.

EVA (extravehicular activity)—Anything done outside the confines of the spacecraft by an astronaut. This includes moonwalks and working in open space.

FOPs—Flight Operations Panel meetings in which mission rules were discussed and adopted.

Gemini—The two-men space mission program preceding Apollo used to learn the intricacies of EVAs, rendezvous, and docking. It also helped determine the effects zero gravity had on the human body.

Kennedy Space Center—NASA's manned launch site.

LRV (Lunar Roving Vehicle)—battery-powered moon cars used on the final three Apollo missions to allow the astronauts to explore larger areas of the lunar surface.

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