The Media and Neo-Populism: A Contemporary Comparative Analysis

By Gianpietro Mazzoleni; Julianne Stewart et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword: Broadening and Deepening
Comparative Research

Jay G. Blumler

A theme of much commentary these days is "political elites on the ropes"! Many late-modern trends have conspired to undercut their standings with the publics they are supposed to serve. These have included: the uncertainties of large-scale economic and social change (see chapter 1); higher rates of crossborder mobility, productive of multicultural tensions; the growth of consumerism, the reverse side of which is decreased popular interest in politics, mainstream parties, and other political institutions; a widening gap between people's expectations of improved standards of public and personal life, and governments' powers to satisfy them; the plummeting appeal of official political communications (resulting also from a host of influences—including the visibility of politicians' news management efforts and the increasingly negative tone of political journalism, especially, but not exclusively in its tabloid versions); and the decline of ideology, which may seem to reduce governmental processes to little more than management and target setting, toward which it is difficult to mobilize sentiments of belief, conviction, meaningful vision, and staunch partisanship.

The emergence of populism from all these conditions—in public opinion, media fare, political marketing by major parties, and especially in radical-right political movements (the timely focus of this book)—was almost inevitable, even if the forms and levels of success of such movements were bound to vary from society to society. Two overarching and well-judged principles of method have guided the authors' analyses of neo-populist parties and leaders. Neither had been applied to this topic before; both demanded path-breaking and painstaking thought and work; and both proved enormously fruitful. One principle was that the

-xv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Media and Neo-Populism: A Contemporary Comparative Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.