Just Schools: A Whole School Approach to Restorative Justice

By Belinda Hopkins | Go to book overview

Subject Index
'f' denotes a figure and 't' denotes a table
active listening 63–77
restorative beliefs underpinning 63–7
restorative enquiry 72–4
skills
developing essential 67–72
self reviews 75–6
summary 77
young people 76–7
'added value' questions 101
agreements, clarifying in mediation 104
restorative conferencing 119t
All Party Parliamentary Group for Children 49–50
anger onion 89–90
appreciation of others, lack of 54
assumptions, responses to misbehaviour 155
attitudes
importance of 168
to restorative and retributive justice 157f
awareness-raising sessions, whole school change 172
behaviour, interrelationship between thoughts, feelings, needs and 66f
behaviour management policies 149–58
external control psychology 149–50
paradigm shift 156–8
questions to consider 150–6
beliefs see restorative beliefs; societal beliefs
body language 67–9
bullying
case study in conferencing 130
victim/offender mediation 104–7
Canada, restorative approach 16
case studies
empathetic listening 92–3
family group conferencing 21–2
ground rules 76–7
mediation 17–18, 112
problem-solving circle 144–5
restorative conferencing 129–30
catering staff, self-review questionnaire 189
change see whole school change
children see young people
Children, Young Persons, and Their Families Act (1989) 19–20
circle time 35
circles 35, 133–46
conflict, dealing with 85–90
ground rules 138–9
guidelines 135
negotiating 137–8
respecting 139–41
introductory workshops 44–59
programme structure 141–2
reasons for ineffectiveness 168
rule making through game playing 139
summary 146
working in 133–7
see also problem-solving circles
citizenship, education in 40
clarifying the agreement in mediation 104
restorative conferencing 119t
classroom assistants, self-review questionnaire 188
closed body language 68
closure
in mediation 104
in restorative conferencing 119t
co-operation, lack of 53
co-ordinators, restorative justice 144, 177
coaching 87–8
identity issues 91
coercion
pro-social behaviour 150
to take part in restorative processes 165
communication
lack of 53
see also restorative conversations
community conferences 35–6, 143
Community Safety Foundation 170
compromise 79–80
concerns, expressing 56–9
conflict
as an opportunity to learn and change 73–4
in conversations 80–1
conflict management
case studies
empathetic listening 92–3
in mediation 112
developing restorative discussion skills 85–90
different perspectives, feelings and needs 81–5
identity issues 91
training young people 108
win-win solutions 79–80
conflict mediation 106
conflicting priorities 178–9

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