Child Neglect: Practice Issues for Health and Social Care

By Julie Taylor; Brigid Daniel | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Page numbers in italics refer to tables and diagrams
absolute poverty 32
abuse
by caregivers 247
dependency-stress model 234
disabled children 229
and home visiting programmes 282
relationship with neglect 30, 62
see also emotional abuse; neglect; physical abuse; sexual abuse
access
to data by professionals 127, 129
to services
influence of social workers over 115
by neglected children 15
to support at family centres for drug users 215–18
accountability 126, 129
achievement, of disabled children 244
ACPCs see area child protection committees
adolescents, relationships with fathers 266
advocacy, for neglected children 164–5
agencies
co-operation in response to neglect 161
communicating information 15–16
joint responsibility for identifying neglect 24
neglect of disabled children 232
role in protection 299–300
see also multi-disciplinary work; working together
aide memoire, for assessment of neglect 87
Alaska checklist, for risk of neglect 20
alcohol abuse 207
effect on children 213
and emotional neglect 68–9
see also drug misuse; substance misuse
ambivalence, of feelings, mothers' 259, 262
antenatal care, VLBW infants 199–200
apparent compliance, of parents 22
area child protection committees
reviews of serious cases 150–1
role in multi-disciplinary working 112
assessment
art of 23
decision making 92–3, 153–4
of families
affected by substance misuse 218–22, 226
as a whole 261
father's role 272–3
effect of focusing on women 257
format 302–3
inclusion of all significant adults 273, 278
information for, interpretation 91–2
interdisciplinary 98–104, 108–9
of need
comprehensive and continuous 42
current situation 307–8
of neglect 17–23
consideration of other factors 139–40
and definitions 79
difference between theory and practice 82–4
in early care 141
establishing 66
family and environmental factors 100–1
role of schools 103
social workers' role 74
studies 74–81
see also care deficit
of parenting 99, 132–5, 251, 305
of resilience, current situation 308
of risk see risk assessment
summary 295–6
for weight faltering 174–5
assessment frameworks 12, 87, 88–90, 90–1, 98–9, 124, 125, 163
assessment paralysis 156
assessment process, questions 91–3
assessment triangle 99
attachment 293–4
disabled children 242–3
to fathers 265, 272
effect of mother's depression 69
and neglect 19, 65, 149–50
as part of care-giving relationship 251, 255
understanding 163
with very low birth weight
infants 187, 194–5, 196, 202–3
attention needs 65
audit
of neglect cases 164
and VLBW infants 205
avoidance, of change 23
Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children 30, 189
babies
energy needs 170
effect of maternal drug use 210, 220
pro-social behaviour 250
serious impairment 236
sleeping position 49
see also very low birth weight
background information 21–2
Barnados What Works 52
basic care
in assessment of neglect 88–9
for disabled children 236–9, 248
basic needs 59, 65, 294
DoH guidance 64
Beckford, Jasmine 58
behavioural development, assessment details 306
behavioural difficulties
disabled children 243
and very low birth weight 191
belief systems
bias 155–6, 208
and perceptions of neglect 73–4, 77–8, 153–4
benefits
Disability Living Allowance 231
level and society's commitment to children 34
and poverty 32
bias
of belief systems in decision making 155–6, 208
in media 49–50
against mothers, regarding neglect 253–5
birth
definitions of preterm birth 188
very low birth weight 187–9
see also childbirth
blame
in cases of serious neglect 147
of disabled children 235, 239
as failure of mothering 294
body mass index 173
body-ownership, need of disabled children 246
boundaries, imposed on disabled children 246
brain development
effect of neglect 98
and VLBW infants 189, 190
British Sign Language 245
bullying, disabled children 240
Campbell Collaboration, systematic literature review 51–2
care 293
aspect of human life 257–8
feminist viewpoint 251–2
need for 250–1
gendered nature of 250, 251–3
measuring 132–3, 135–7, 136
social context 260–1
see also care deficit; commitment to care; relationship of care
care deficit
in parenting, identification 132, 134–5, 139–40, 145, 220–1
see also care; commitment to care; parental culpability; relationship of care
care ethics 251

-341-

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