James Bond and Philosophy: A S.P.E.C.T.R.E Stalks Philosophy

By Jacob M. Held; James B. South | Go to book overview

4
Bond and Phenomenology:
Shaken, Not Stirred

SUZIE GIBSON

Shaken, not stirred”—this is James Bond's preferred way to drink a martini. The familiar, oft-repeated phrase tells us many things about Ian Fleming's hero—some obvious, some obscure. For instance, Bond's choice of drink reveals that he not only enjoys strong alcohol, but the sort consumed in high society. The martini connotes the glamour, sophistication, and wealth of the fashionable and privileged. Bond's partiality for this drink, and indeed his strict instructions concerning its preparation, suggest that he is no slouch when it comes to fashion.

Bond is the epitome of cool. His reconnaissance activities often require that he rub shoulders with the extravagant and elite. Although he is adept, even triumphant in this role, he is not a full-time member of the martini-drinking class. His work, which is his raison d'être, is far too important for that. Yet it's not simply a matter of national and patriotic duty over-riding excessive and indulgent desires—it's a matter of international security! What's more, Bond would never dream of becoming a member of any social group, glamorous or otherwise, because he is far too cool and sophisticated for that.

Bond is a loner, which agrees with his secret life and work as a spy. Being a licensed-to-kill member of the British Secret Service, he lives, acts, thinks—and drinks—outside the fray of social climbers and glamorous wannabes. From this vantage point, he is untouchable. He is also, perhaps, invincible. The injunction—“shaken, not stirred”—enunciates a cool sensibility that is the result of a carefully developed, fostered, and cultivated intelligence. Bond's experiential understanding and plea

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
James Bond and Philosophy: A S.P.E.C.T.R.E Stalks Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.