Ordeal by Fire: Canada, 1910-1945

By Ralph Allen | Go to book overview

XXXII
The Constitutional Crisis--The Liberals evade a desperate defeat and Meighen makes way for R. B. Bennett

BY the time the parliamentary committee brought in its report Mackenzie King had won his by-election and was back in the House as the besieged government's commander.

He made no attempt to deny what had gone on within the corrupt little principality of the Customs Department. His main concern was to see that in whatever opaque and distant cloudland the blame came to rest, it would be nowhere near the eyrie of the Cabinet. If, he tried to reason, Jacques Bureau was responsible, it would still be unfair to pin the whole responsibility for his action on the government. If the government was deceived by Bureau, so was the Opposition. "I will take for the moment the three years 1922, 1923, and 1924, the first three of this government in office. I ask honorable members if there is a single one of their number in this House who had not the highest respect for the integrity, the ability, and the honesty of Hon. Jacques Bureau."

King sought to claim for the government most of the credit for the activities of Walter Duncan, the detective. As for the homme fatal, Joseph Bisaillon, it was true he had not been dismissed until ten months after the first complaint and dossier were laid on the Prime Minister's desk. He had been kept on so long, King maintained, only to avoid frightening off his accomplices before they could be trapped.

To suit the predicament of his new Customs Minister, Boivin, King had even loftier words: "I ask honorable members, when they are recording their votes, to remember that every man who goes into public life sooner or later is certain to be subjected to the kind of thing to which my honorable friend is being subjected today.

-274-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ordeal by Fire: Canada, 1910-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.