Ordeal by Fire: Canada, 1910-1945

By Ralph Allen | Go to book overview

LIII
The departure of the Aging Turks--Ontario gets a new school reader

THROUGH the habit of a century, Canada emerged from the Second World War lamenting its modesty, decrying its inferiority complex, and asking itself quite audibly why it was so timid about raising its voice.

But the half-true stereotypes of a half generation before were no more than the roughest, most approximate sort of fit for the Canada of 1945.

Canada had learned to recognize the sound of its own footsteps. If, in this first year of what passed for a new peace, they seemed to be taking many directions, they still had a firmer ring than ever before. In another decade they might lose some of their sharpness amid the muffling sounds of Hollywood, NBC-TV, and a new rush of U.S.A. investment money. At times they would disappear entirely amid the thunder of the cold war and the overwhelming pronouncements of Washington. But in this confident year of 1945, no country in the world was more confident than Canada, or had better cause to be.

The first war had established Canada as a tough little military nation, precocious and resourceful. In spite of the red herring of conscription the second war confirmed this part of the country's place in the world. And economically and industrially it had grown beyond imagining.

Thanks to efficient price and wage controls, heavy taxation, and war-bond drives, the treasury had spent more than eighteen billion dollars on the war--an average of six thousand dollars for every family of four--and emerged at least theoretically solvent. It had paid its own way (or assumed its own debts) and in addition

-473-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ordeal by Fire: Canada, 1910-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 492

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.