Pastoral Theology: A Black-Church Perspective

By James H. Harris | Go to book overview

4
Church
Administration

The black minister is expected by the black church and the
black community to provide leadership, energy, and wisdom
in the struggle to change the oppressive economic, social, and
political burdens of black life in America
.

Charles Shelby Rooks

As a theology of liberation, black theology is concerned with understanding the Bible in light of the suffering and oppression of black people. God is viewed as a friend of the poor—one who takes sides with the disenfranchised and despised. Jesus is the norm, or the paradigm, of effectuating freedom whose mission was and is to set the captive free. The Holy Spirit is the empowering force that ultimately makes freedom possible.

Floyd Massey, Jr. and Samuel B. McKinney, in their book Church Administration in the Black Perspective,1 barely discuss the practice of liberation as an administrative mandate. Church administration in the broad sense is everything the church does from managing the budget, developing tithing and stewardship theology, program planning, and office management to preaching on Sunday morning. The saying that the preacher [does church administration on Sunday morning from the pulpit,] although true, needs to be stated in a more comprehensive way in order to include the art and practice of church administration.


Church Administration and Liberation

Black church administration is no longer a secondary issue. It is critical to the development of a people who aspire to be free. Managing the church in today's hostile social environment, which perpetuates inequality and injustice, requires a commitment to liberation grounded in the belief that God's divine plan does not include the subjugation of blacks. The church

-71-

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Pastoral Theology: A Black-Church Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part One - The Black Church 1
  • 1: Blacks, Evangelicalism, and Beyond 3
  • 2: The Urban Community 29
  • 3: Black Theology 55
  • Part Two - Pastoral Theology 69
  • 4: Church Administration 71
  • 5: Worship and Preaching 89
  • 6: Christian Education 101
  • 7: Self-Esteem in the Black Church 115
  • Notes 131
  • Bibliography 143
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