Engel v. Vitale: Prayer in the Schools

By Susan Dudley Gold | Go to book overview

ForeworD

AmenDmenT I, UnITeD STaTes
consTITuTIon

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment
of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or
abridging the freedom, of speech, or of the press-, or the
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and, to petition
the Government for a redress of grievances
.

ReLIGIous FreeDom is among the most prized of American liberties. The First Amendment guarantees all Americans that freedom. Under the amendment's terms. Congress can neither establish a state-approved religion nor prevent people from practicingtheir own religion or no religion.

Many of the early European settlers fled from nations with state religions intolerant of other beliefs. They came to America seeking a land where they could observe their faith without interference from the government and state churches. Remembering this history, America's founders resisted pressure to establish a state church in the United States. Patrick Henry, the firebrand patriot from Virginia, led a passionate crusade in the mid—1780s to declare

-7-

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Engel v. Vitale: Prayer in the Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 2
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • One - The Regents' Prayer 12
  • Two - A Constitution and a Bill of Rights 18
  • Three - First Amendment on Trial 38
  • Four - A Prayer Goes to Court 66
  • Five - Before the Supreme Court 79
  • Six - A Landmark Desicion 98
  • Seven - Politics and Religion: A Potent Mix 125
  • Timeline 134
  • Notes 137
  • Further Information 146
  • Bibliography 150
  • Index 156
  • About the Author 160
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