Engel v. Vitale: Prayer in the Schools

By Susan Dudley Gold | Go to book overview

one

THE REGENTS' PRAYER

ManY U.S. SCHOOLCHILDren in the 1950s and early 1960s started their mornings by reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and joining together in a short prayer. In public schools in New Hyde Park, New York, teachers led students in a prayer approved by the local school board. New York's State Board of Regents had adopted the prayer—known as the Regents' Prayer—on November 30, 1951, and had recommended that schools in the state use it in their opening rituals each morning. The twenty-two-word prayer read:

Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence
upon Thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, our
parents, our teachers and our Country.

After several failed attempts, school board member Mary Harte, who also served as a state regent, won support for her motion that the prayer [be said daily] in the public schools administered by Union Free School District No. 9 (also known as Herricks school system) in New Hyde Park on Long Island. Only board member Philip J. Freed voted against the motion. Following the vote, on July 8, 1958, the board instructed the district principal to have each class recite the prayer after the Pledge of Allegiance every morning.

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Engel v. Vitale: Prayer in the Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 2
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • One - The Regents' Prayer 12
  • Two - A Constitution and a Bill of Rights 18
  • Three - First Amendment on Trial 38
  • Four - A Prayer Goes to Court 66
  • Five - Before the Supreme Court 79
  • Six - A Landmark Desicion 98
  • Seven - Politics and Religion: A Potent Mix 125
  • Timeline 134
  • Notes 137
  • Further Information 146
  • Bibliography 150
  • Index 156
  • About the Author 160
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.