The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America

By Eric P. Kaufmann | Go to book overview

Notes

1. Introduction

1. The Canadian sociologist John Porter coined this structure a "vertical mosaic" in reference to WASP dominance in Canada (Porter 1965).

2. From the Greek cosmo and polls, meaning "the world is my city." Anthony Smith argues that nationalists have traditionally viewed cosmopolitanism as the antithesis of nationalism and ethnicity. He adds that cosmopolitanism has a long pedigree that embraces the history of most of the major empires and religious realms. However, Smith maintains that, in its current, postmodernist form, cosmopolitanism constitutes a "memoryless," problematic entity (Smith 1990a: 6; 1990b: 174–175; 1995: 19–21).

For Ulf Hannerz, cosmopolitanism is more of an ideology of the Self, which entails a set of relationships to a diversity of cultures. In his words, "a more genuine cosmopolitanism is first of all an orientation, a willingness to engage with the Other. It is an intellectual and aesthetic stance of openness toward divergent cultural experiences, a search for contrasts rather than uniformity" (Hannerz 1990: 239). Whereas ethnic identity is delimited in territorial (space) and ancestral (time) terms, I use the term cosmopolitanism to describe the phenomenon of spaceless, timeless, "virtual" identity. Fields of cosmopolitan activity need not be global in scale—though global extension often constitutes the goal of a cosmopolitan social movement.


2. The Rise of Anglo-America

1. Even those who have acknowledged the presence of American dominant ethnicity have tended to explain it as a transient phenomenon, present only as a series of brief "nativist" upsurges against a background of liberal openness, the result of economic deprivation or racist ideology (Higham "1955" 1988; Kohn 1957). Liah Greenfeld writes that nativism and Anglo-Saxonism were "a marginal alternative to the national identity which was profoundly universalistic" (Greenfeld 1992: 438).

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Rise and Fall of Anglo-America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • I - The Wasp Ascendancy 9
  • 2: The Rise of Anglo-America 11
  • 3: Limited Liberals 37
  • 4: Conservative Egalitarians 58
  • II - The Cosmopolitan Vanguard, 1900–1939 83
  • 5: Pioneers of Equality 85
  • 6: Cosmopolitan Clerics 111
  • 7: Expressive Pathfinders 144
  • III - The Fall of Anglo-America 175
  • 8: Cosmopolitanism Institutionalized, 1930–1970 177
  • 9: The Decline of Anglo-America 207
  • 10: Cultural Modernization 244
  • 11: American Whiteness 258
  • 12: Liberal Ethnicity and Cultural Revival 283
  • 13: Conclusion 305
  • Notes 315
  • References 329
  • Acknowledgments 363
  • Index 365
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.