Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism

By Dieter Henrich; David S. Pacini | Go to book overview

Foreword: Remembrance
through Disenchantment

DAVID S. PACINI

The subject of this book is the transition from Kant's transcendental philosophy to Hegel's idealism, and most narrowly, the different conceptions of the subject that emerged during this era. These are the hallmarks, but by no means the limits, of the work that German philosopher Dieter Henrich has undertaken over the past half-century. In 1973, while still professor of philosophy at Heidelberg, Henrich traveled to Harvard University's Emerson Hall to present the findings of his research, including interpretations of what were then newly discovered manuscripts dating from the period of classical German philosophy (1781-1844). The course of lectures he offered there forms the basis of this book. Apart from scholars specializing in this philosophical period, Henrich was then little known to the English-speaking world. But within these specialist circles, he had already established a reputation for path-breaking scholarship on Kant, Fichte, Hölderlin, and Hegel, particularly with his paper on the problems of selfconsciousness.1

The presence of an interpreter of the intricacies of German idealism

1. Among the early writings of Dieter Henrich, the following are especially notable for
their continuing influence: "The Proof Structure of Kant's Transcendental Deduction," Re-
view of Metaphysics, 22 (1969): 640-659 [republished in Kant on Pure Reason, ed. R. C. S.
Walker (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1982), pp. 66-81]; "Fichtes ursprüngliche
Einsicht," in Subjektivität und Metaphysik. Festschrift für Wolfgang Cramer, ed. Dieter
Henrich and Hans Wagner (Frankfurt am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 1966); English: FOI;
"Hölderlin über Urteil und Sein. Eine Studie zur Entstehungsgeschichte des Idealismus,"
Hölderlin-Jahrbuch, 14 (1965-1966): 73-96; English: HJB; "Formen der Negation in Hegels
Logik," Hegel-Jahrbuch 1974 (Köln, 1975): 245-256. For his paper on the problems of self-
consciousness, see D. Henrich, "Selbstbewusstsein. Kritische Einleitung in eine Theorie," in
Hermeneutik und Dialektik. Aufsätze [Hans-Georg Gadamer zum 70. Geburtstag], ed. Rüdiger

-ix-

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