Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism

By Dieter Henrich; David S. Pacini | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The best use of one's eyes, quipped Shakespeare, is to see the way of blindness. I can scarcely wink at the soaring debts I have incurred in the preparation of this volume. Thanks are due to Renee Burwell and the members of the Office of Candler Support Services—especially Sandra Tucker— who contributed to various stages of technical production. So, too, to my Emory graduate students from the programs in religion and philosophy, who have given generously of their time and enthusiasm: Elizabeth W. Corrie, Hannah L. Friday, Felicia M. McDuffie and Eric E. Wilson offered critical and judicious readings—Eric, together with Courtney Hammond and Dorothea Wildenburg, nuanced suggestions for Hölderlin translations—and Tricia C. Anderson, research assistant, indefatigable bibliographic research and production, as well as editorial and transcription assistance through multiple revisions of the project. To Oliver Baum, Emory Department of Philosophy, I owe thanks for patient tutelage in, and editorial review of, the subtleties of German scholarly notation. For a steadfast and keen editorial eye lent to all aspects of this work (particularly the final textual and bibliographic revisions), thereby sparing me from more errors in content and style than I otherwise might have borne, I gratefully acknowledge the unfaltering collaboration of another research assistant, Stacia M. Brown. Colleagues at the Candler School of Theology and in the Emory College Department of Religion offered helpful suggestions for improving the Foreword and unfailingly made insightful criticisms, E. Brooks Holifield and Laurie L. Patton, especially so.

None of this work would have been possible without the generous support of the Mellon Foundation, the Program for Research and Travel of the Candler School of Theology, and Russell E. Richey, Dean of Candler. Dean Richey's keen commitment to the support of scholarly research and publi-

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