Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism

By Dieter Henrich; David S. Pacini | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

The time between the publication of the Critique of Pure Reason in 17811 and the 1844 publication of Kierkegaard's Concept of Anxiety2—the same year in which Marx wrote the Early Economical Philosophical Manu scripts3—is just sixty-three years. Shorter still is the time from the publication of the Critique of Pure Reason to the final step Hegel made in his philosophical development: the establishment of a speculative logic as the fundamental discipline of his system and not simply a negative introduction into it.4 This happened in 1804, the same year in which Kant died. What is astonishing about this very short period of time is that within it, the entire development from Kant through Fichte and Schelling to Hegel occurred. This unique development that unfolded during the late lifetime of Kant both invites and resists interpretation.

Anglo-Saxon philosophy has tended to regard the philosophical developments during these two decades as opaque and suspicious.5 From this

1. I. Kant (1724-1804), KrV A; English: CPR.

2. S. Kierkegaard (1813-1855), Begrebet Angest [1844], ed. A. B. Drachmann, in Sv, vol. VI
(1963), pp. 101-240; English: The Concept of Anxiety, ed. and trans. Reidar Thomte with Al-
bert B. Anderson (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1980).

3. K. Marx (1818-1883), Ökonomisch-philosophische Manuskripte aus dem Jahre 1844
[1932], ed. Rolf Dlubeck, in MEGA, vol. I,2 (1982), pp. 189-438; English: The Economic and
Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844, trans. Martin Milligan (Moscow: Foreign Languages Pub-
lishing House, 1959). Written between April and August 1844 in Paris, these manuscripts
were not published until 1932.

4. G. W. F. Hegel (1770-1831), SsP.

5. Notable among these criticisms of philosophical idealism are certainly those of
Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) and G. E. Moore (1873-1958). Bertrand Russell, Theory of
Knowledge: The 1913 Manuscript, ed. E. R. Eames and K. Blackwell (London: Allen and

-1-

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