Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism

By Dieter Henrich; David S. Pacini | Go to book overview

15
Theories of Imagination and Longing
and Their Impact on Schlegel,
Novalis, and Hölderlin

It is now possible for us to imagine something of the impression that Fichte made when he offered his philosophical theory.1 Within the context we have established, we can see that Fichte's theory is both idealistic and not at all absurd. So far I have interpreted two aspects of Fichte's theory about our belief in the existence of an external world, both of which he treats in the theoretical science of knowledge. The first aspect is that the mind introduces a mental construct of the external world; the second is that this world is the indeterminate (i.e., nonmental) dimension of correlates to the states of our minds. Fichte treats the third aspect, which concerns the external cause of our states of mind—the body—in his practical science of knowledge, thereby completing his answer to this decisive question for any idealistic position. Having dealt with imagination and intuition (or perception), that is, with the establishment of a correlate between the states of the mind and something that is not mental, we still have not gotten to the idea of an external cause of our states of mind. We have no idea of the world insofar as it might resist our activities—of the thing that has power, for instance, and the world where there are energies, and so on. So far, we have only structural correlates in perception.

1. Two problems will remain after this lecture: first, Fichte's primary and most interesting
philosophical achievement—the introduction of the theory of the self-referential structure
of consciousness into philosophy. That is a problem connected with the highest point of his
philosophy, to which Henrich will turn in the next lecture. Second, there is also the problem
everyone will encounter right at the start in reading Fichte, namely, the relationship between
that strange "Self," that is in some sense absolute, and the individual self. This is traditionally
stated as the problem of a relationship between the absolute and the empirical self. It was
one of the problems with which Fichte was constantly struggling and could not solve.

-216-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.