Between Kant and Hegel: Lectures on German Idealism

By Dieter Henrich; David S. Pacini | Go to book overview

20
The Way to the Fifth Philosophy
(The Science of Logic)

I turn now to an analysis of the systematic structure of Hegel's work. Within the confines of this undertaking, I can only hope to provide general ideas that have to do in the main with the principles on which Hegel's system was built. Just as I began this investigation with an account of the systematic structure of Kant's critical philosophy, I end with a corresponding account of Hegel's philosophy, albeit one that is regrettably much more sketchy than was my account of Kant. Many lecture courses and books bear the title "From Kant to Hegel."1 We may consider this title apt only insofar as it refers to the temporal order of the philosophers and their work. In most cases, however, the title "From Kant to Hegel" also implies a sequence of decisive systematic improvements in a particular kind of philosophy. I think circumspection is warranted here and therefore eschew the implication of this title that we can assume such improvements from the outset.

To be sure, during the time "from Kant to Hegel" there was indeed historical progress. Numerous thinkers were able to give voice to deeper expression of the most vital ideas and experiences of modern life, and they introduced experiments with new possibilities of thinking. But to equate the deeper expression of experiences and the meaningful experiments in

1. Among these are Heinrich Moritz Chalybaus, Historical Development of Speculative
Philosophy from Kant to Hegel (Edinburgh: Clark, 1854); A. S. Pringle-Pattison, The Develop-
ment from Kant to Hegel (London: Williams and Norgate, 1882); Richard Kroner, Von Kant
bis Hegel (Tübingen: Mohr, 1961); Leonard Nelson, Progress and Regress in Philosophy: From
Hume and Kant to Hegel and Fries (Oxford: Blackwell, 1970); and Wayne Christando, The
Metaphysics of Science and Freedom: From Descartes to Kant to Hegel (Aldershot: Avebury,
1991).

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